Documenting the seasons of coastal Dorset. I'm a complete amateur so don't trust I'm always right. If ever you see I'm wrong - whether with identifications or in anything else - do say!

Sunday, 13 November 2011

LET'S VISIT A TREE



This is the walk . . .

. . . with the tree we are visiting straight ahead, on the left hand side of the path.

It's very tall - which I know isn't a precise way to describe it - but, for scale, a car could pass down this track easily and have room to spare either side.





Its needles are like this.







There are several trees like it. Ivy grows up one of the narrower trunks.


The bark is peeling from them all. I'm startled by the red. Shiny and wet in the autumn rain, the exposed wood looks like flesh.


It has dinosaur toes.

I was going to check with iSpot - but the site is down so . . . does anyone know the name of this tree?

(It isn't Fred.)

12 comments:

Kitty said...

I would say yew, but it looks like one very tall individual!

Elephant's Eye said...

Snap, have just tried ZA iSpot. Also down. Must be doing weekend maintenance.

One said...

I have no clue but I like the leaves. Great captures.

Mark Willis said...

it certainly looks like a Yew, though Yews don't normally grow that tall, do they?

Toffeeapple said...

Western Yew in my opinion, the bark is magnificent.

Gardens at Waters East said...

I don't know the name of the tree though it does look like it could be part of the Yew family. In any case, the photos are excellent today. Do like your posting. Jack

Ali said...

I've got no idea, but it looks quite magnificent - I love the red. Can see why you got a little startled by it though, not the colour I would normally associate with a tree trunk.

Donna@Gardens Eye View said...

Lucy it is gorgeous and does look in the Yew family...I love the bark and dinosaur toes!!

Dimple said...

I also think it is a yew, but I am far from an expert. It is beautiful!

Thanks for the condolences on the death of my aunt. She will not soon be forgotten!

PatioPatch said...

Looking through your eyes Lucy, trees become very personal. With that startlingly ruddy bark research possibly pinpointed Taxus Brevifolia (Pacific Yew) though could not id it on the dinosaur toes

Becky said...

I have no idea kind of tree Fred is you certainly captured his beauty. The close up of the bark makes a striking photograph both light and dark, but I like the whole story the very best!

Country Mouse Studio said...

No idea but it's beautiful. I love the bark